Aunty Margaret’s Rojak

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fruit rojakI must’ve been looking at this recipe for quite sometime now. Looking and droolin. Droolin coz there’s no where I can get all the ingredients like it should be, drooling coz I can’t just fly back now to order this at the famous rojak stall and droolin coz I have never tried it out this way before … until today.

Bam! And it hit me.

If i was siting in front of the stall, I would be ordering seconds for help. But since it was my own kitchen, I couldn’t help but just get seconds and third helpings. (*blush ) Yeah, there’s no eu char kuey, no bean sprouts today, no sweet turnip (ban-kwang) at this time yet (3 weeks too early from the harvest)…and I have no ready made Hae Ko. BUT where there’s a will, there’s a way.

This is the original recipe with credits to Bern’s aunty Margaret. (Thank you Auntie for the inspirations!) I have modified it a little, and noted it right at the end. Of course, it probably can’t beat those “famous” rojak stalls, but I’m pretty satisfied with my results. There are so many variations which you can do. It is usually a vegetarien salad made up of differant vegetables and tropical sour fruits, or some uses sea food to go with it. Whatever the variation, the most important thing that has to be correct is the rojak sauce itself. If it doesn’t taste right, your rojak is not going to make you happy. Rojak is usually a snack eaten at any time of the day. It’s a little sweet and sour with a little fishy spur at the end. I used to take it home from the stall after school hours to lift up my taste buds. There’s indian rojak, malay rojak, penang rojak. Back home, we’ve been pretty particular about the cleanliness of the stalls. A bad rojak can give you a real bad stomach if not carefull. A shame I wasn’t able to get eu char kuay for this. Better planning for me, the next time round.
So here goes:

indian_rojak

Apart from living some of her dreams on a tight schedule, Chris blogs and designs. Originating from the land of the assam laksa, she is now home-based in southern Germany. Authentic asian cooking challenges her to bring fond foodie memories of home in her kitchen.

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